Export of Rohu to Bangladesh via Sittway border declining

Tilapia fishes seen in the market. Photo Supplied 0
Rohu fish is exported to Bangladesh market through Sittway border.  Photo Supplied
Rohu fish is exported to Bangladesh market through Sittway border.  Photo Supplied
Rohu fish is exported to Bangladesh market through Sittway border.  Photo Supplied

The export of Rohu (Labeo Rohita) from Myanmar to Bangladesh via Sittway border trade camp is declining this year, according to the Ministry of Commerce.
Myanmar supplies about 600,000 visses (one viss equals 3.6 lb) of rohu fish to various fish depot markets every day. Rohu is sent from Yangon market to the Sittway border trade camp before being exported to Bangladesh. Myanmar is also exporting other products such as dried fish, onion and garlic to Bangladesh.
Myanmar usually exports around 50 to 100 tonnes of Rohu fish to Bangladesh. However, the export of Rohu has declined starting from March. The trade between Myanmar and Bangladesh via Sittway border reached US$ 289 million in two months of 2020.
Rohu is one of the export products of Myanmar. The price of Rohu is instable in the market because there is a high consumption of fish.
Myanmar’s second-largest export commodity to Bangladesh is freshwater rohus (Labeo Rohita). Although bilateral trade between Myanmar and Bangladesh has high potential, the trade between the two countries has declined this year for many reasons. So, Myanmar will export a variety of beans, onion, turmeric and ginger to Bangladesh through sea route to promote the bilateral trade.
The value of border trade between Myanmar and Bangladesh from 1 October to 1 May of 2019-2020 fiscal year reached US$743.2 million, which showed an increase of US$729.6 million, compared with the same period of last FY, according to the Ministry of Commerce.
The products traded between the two countries include bamboo, ginger, peanuts, saltwater prawns and fish, dried plums, garlic, rice, mung beans, blankets, candy, plum jams, footwear, frozen food, chemicals, leather, jute products, tobacco, plastics, wood, knitwear, and beverages. —Aye Maung  (Translated by Hay Mar)

Share this post

Comments

Hot News
Hot News