Local growers profit as India raises import quota for mung beans

Merchants evaluate quality of pulses at the Mandalay wholesale market.  Photo: Tin Zar Hlaing
Merchants evaluate quality of pulses at the Mandalay wholesale market.  Photo: Tin Zar Hlaing

With India increasing the quota for mung beans imports for next year and pre-purchasing Myanmar mung beans, local growers are reaping a profit, according to the Mandalay Depot.
“Myanmar has exported 150,000 tons of mung beans as of October, 2019. India has increased the import quota for mung beans to fulfill its domestic demand. India will import up to 250,000 tons of mung beans from Myanmar by the end of March. We expect that there will be only around 40,000 or 50,000 tons of mung beans in the local market. India is pre-purchasing mung beans which will yield in March, 2020. Mung beans are grown mostly in the lower parts of the country. Local farmers from Ayeyawady and Bago regions are happy with the handsome profit as India has increased the mung bean quota,” said U Myo Swe, vice chairman of Mandalay Depot.
“In 2016, India stopped purchasing mung beans and pigeon peas (red gram). Later, it began importing a small volume of beans, depending on the demand. On account of the climate change in India, its import requirement for mung beans and green grams has increased. India is importing a larger volume of green grams from other countries compared with Myanmar. However, it is importing mung beans mainly through Myanmar. This year, the local mung bean growers are happy with the handsome profit. Mung beans are grown mainly in upper and lower regions of the country, he added.
With the increase in India’s mung bean quota, the price of mung beans has increased to K110,000 per ton.
In the 2018-2019 financial year, Myanmar exported over 1.64 million tons of beans and pulses, including over 600,000 tons of mung beans, and earned more than US$1 billion.—Tin Zar Hlaing (Translated by Hay Mar)

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