Peace does not come from a meeting room, but from your heart and mind

The Shan State reached a milestone for peace in Myanmar, holding a national level political dialogue on 23rd April for the state.
The representatives of the people in the Shan State, where the historic Panglong Agreement was signed in 1947, are participating in the three-day dialogue. To be read, discussed and debated are a total of 70 papers – 26 political papers, 23 papers on the economy and 21 papers on land issues, natural resources and environmental conservation.
Some of these papers were read on the first day of the dialogue.
This is all being done to achieve peace in Myanmar, which has been plagued by armed conflicts for centuries.
The Shan State experienced armed conflicts throughout its history. With the Panglong  Agreement signed by General Aung San and ethnic leaders, there was peace, albeit temporary.
The Union was established by sacrificing many lives, but no progress was made until the next step was taken after the fighting.
Political dialogue is the first step towards ending of armed conflicts, solving the political dilemma through political means with peace and building a union which can guarantee physical and mental peace for our future generations.
The Union Peace Conference-21st Century Panglong was held in Nay Pyi Taw from 31st August to 3rd September 2016, and the success of the conference could build trust among the stake holders, even though they have diverse opinions.
Differing views and visions exist not only between armed organizations and the government, but also in different forms among different groups across the nation. Differences depend on political outlooks, race, religion, social attitudes and visions. If we really want democracy, we need to believe that different visions can be solved in a peaceful way.
It is important for all participants in the peace process to strive for unity and for the emergence of the Federal Democratic Union.
Peace does not come from a meeting room, but from the hearts and minds of all concerned.
All participants in the peace process should strive for unity and for the emergence of the Federal Democratic Union. Our main strength, and the common quality that should bring us together, should be our sense of duty.

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