Reduce plastic bag usage: A call for change

Plastic bags have become a ubiquitous packaging material due to their affordability and wide availability. While they serve as a crucial part of daily lives, the environmental consequences of plastic pollution pose a significant threat to ecosystems, humans, and animals alike.
Year after year, industries worldwide produce over 380 tonnes of plastic materials and products, with a staggering 460 million tonnes manufactured in 2019 alone. Consequently, people across the globe are grappling with the adverse effects of plastic products. Plastic bags are rarely reused by consumers, leading to their disposal after a single use.
These discarded plastic bags accumulate in landfills and water bodies, particularly in seas and oceans. Birds mistake them for feed, resulting in dire consequences, while fish often meet their demise entangled in these plastic traps. For instance, sea turtles struggle to differentiate between jellyfish and plastic bags, often succumbing to digestion-related issues.
The present scenario is disheartening, with businesses worldwide producing approximately five trillion plastic bags annually. Startlingly, researchers estimate that the combined material of these bags could encircle the Earth seven times over. Although the original intention was to promote multiple uses, a mere nine per cent of plastic bags are reused globally.

Similarly, Myanmar must take measures to curtail the use of plastic products and bags as part of its efforts to combat plastic pollution within the country. It is imperative to raise public awareness about the consequences of plastic waste, urging individuals to reject plastic bags and packaging materials whenever possible. By doing so, Myanmar’s society and environment can be relieved of excessive plastic pollution, enabling future generations to thrive without the dangers associated with plastic contamination.

Nowadays, disposable plastic bags and products litter roads and residences as waste. The United Nations Environment Programme-UNEP recently projected that plastic waste in the oceans could reach a staggering volume of 75 million to 199 million tonnes. This alarming prediction underscores the urgent need to address the pervasive issue of plastic bags and daily product usage worldwide.
Similarly, Myanmar must take measures to curtail the use of plastic products and bags as part of its efforts to combat plastic pollution within the country. It is imperative to raise public awareness about the consequences of plastic waste, urging individuals to reject plastic bags and packaging materials whenever possible. By doing so, Myanmar’s society and environment can be relieved of excessive plastic pollution, enabling future generations to thrive without the dangers associated with plastic contamination.
The government, businesses, and communities must work together to implement policies that promote sustainable alternatives to plastic bags. Encouraging the use of reusable bags, promoting the adoption of biodegradable materials, and investing in recycling infrastructure are essential steps in mitigating the plastic waste crisis. By limiting plastic product and bag usage, it is necessary to create a cleaner, healthier world, free from the perils of plastic pollution. Let’s seize this opportunity and pave the way for a sustainable future.

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