Speaker relates current constitution to federalism, which refers to integration rather than separation

Speaker of Pyidaungsu Hluttaw and Pyithu Hluttaw Thura U Shwe Mann and Amyotha Hluttaw Speaker U Khin Aung Myint meet leaders of armed ethnic groups.
Speaker of Pyidaungsu Hluttaw and Pyithu Hluttaw Thura U Shwe Mann and Amyotha Hluttaw Speaker U Khin Aung Myint meet leaders of armed ethnic groups.

Speaker of Pyidaungsu Hluttaw and Pyithu Hluttaw Thura U Shwe Mann and Speaker of Amyotha Hluttaw U Khin Aung Myint met delegates of ethnic groups here on Friday, officials said.
Speaking at the meeting, Thura U Shwe Mann stressed the importance of the action and attitude of ethnic armed groups in building lasting peace as desired by the whole country.
“The government and the parliament also need to show genuine goodwill in the process”.
The speaker urged ethnic groups to grasp the opportunity to make peace a reality, pledging the assistance of parliament in making the process smooth and adding that negotiations are the best way to restore national conciliation and internal peace.
U Khin Aung Myint briefed on the role the parliament play in the peace process, emphasizing that the parliament is now working on constitutional amendment, which he said is key to the restoration of peace.
Political dialogues will follow ceasefire, with the speaker adding that some points relating to constitutional amendment need over 75% approval of parliament and others a nationwide referendum.
Ethnic groups present at the meeting were the Karen National Unity (KNU), Restoration Council of Shan State/ Shan State Army (RCSS/SSA), United Wa State Army (UWSA), Shan State Progressive Party/ Shan State Army (SSPP/SSA), National Democratic Alliance Army-Eastern Shan State (NDAA), New Mon State Party (NMSP), All Burma Students’ Democratic Front (ABSDF), Chin National Front, Pa-O National Liberation Organization (PNLO), Arakan Liberation Party (ALP), and National Socialist Council of Nagaland-Khaplang (NSCN-K).
In his closing remarks to the meeting, Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Speaker Thura U Shwe Mann described mutual understanding, mutual respect and mutual trust as three crucial factors that can wipe out doubt and distrust. “Sincerity and transparency will build understanding, then respect and then trust,” he said, urging ethnic delegates to speak their minds.
The amendment of the State Constitution 2008 is related to national unity, national reconciliation and internal peace in one way or another, according to the speaker. He mentioned the new constitution should promise national integrity, stability and development, shape lasting peace through the unity among national races, and add new momentum to democratic reform.
The current constitution is based on a form of federal democratic republic, he said, adding that federalism refers to integration rather than separation.
The justice and fairness of the sharing of power, wealth and resource require the easing of centralization, he pointed out.

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