Promote sustainable management of e-waste: A global imperative

In the era of technological advancement, electronic waste (e-waste) poses a grave threat to the global population. Despite the strides made in various technologies, the adverse effects of improper disposal of electronic products are hazardous to both human health and environmental well-being.

However, many developing countries face challenges in adopting and implementing effective e-waste management policies. As a developing nation, Myanmar must proactively formulate e-waste prevention plans to secure the well-being of its people in the future. Public awareness campaigns on systematic disposal, reuse, and recycling of e-waste are crucial not only for environmental conservation but also for cost savings and society’s overall
well-being.

Contact with or inhaling vapours containing acids in refining metals from electronic products can adversely affect respiratory and internal organs. Recognizing the potential dangers posed by unsystematic disposal, some countries classify it as a criminal offence, emphasizing the need to protect the natural environment.
In the course of daily routines, people worldwide generate various types of waste, including kitchen waste, industrial waste, agricultural waste, and hazardous waste. Among these, electronic waste, commonly known as e-waste, emerges as a significant threat to daily life. The rapid development of technology, coupled with high demand for electronic equipment globally, has led to a surge in e-waste production. E-waste encompasses fluorescence, small-scale information technology and telecom accessories, monitors, thermo steps, heavy machinery, and small-scale machinery.
Surveys conducted by various organizations reveal that the world discards over 50 tonnes of e-waste annually. On average, individuals dispose of approximately seven kilograms of e-waste each year, with only 17 per cent of it being systematically recycled and reused.
The importance of safely recycling and reusing e-waste extends beyond environmental preservation; it directly impacts human health. In 2019, 78 countries, constituting 71 per cent of the global community, implemented e-waste laws, policies, and rules. Some environmentally responsible companies have taken the initiative to develop plans for the proper reuse and recycling of e-waste, demonstrating a commitment to safeguarding both the environment and living beings.
However, many developing countries face challenges in adopting and implementing effective e-waste management policies. As a developing nation, Myanmar must proactively formulate e-waste prevention plans to secure the well-being of its people in the future. Public awareness campaigns on systematic disposal, reuse, and recycling of e-waste are crucial not only for environmental conservation but also for cost savings and society’s overall well-being.
As everybody needs to mark one year since the inception of efforts to address this critical issue, they have to collectively commit to a sustainable and responsible approach to managing electronic waste for the benefit of current and future generations to be free from possible dangers as well as the health of the world.

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